The Life of T.E. Lawrence
T.E. Lawrence on the cover of TIME magazine, 1932.

T.E. Lawrence on the cover of TIME magazine, 1932.

The fireplace and mantle in the music room at Clouds Hill.

The fireplace and mantle in the music room at Clouds Hill.

T.E. Lawrence at the Imperial War Museum

A reader recently e-mailed the Imperial War Museum in London for information about T.E. Lawrence displays and the location of his Brough Superior motorcycle. Here is the response she received, which I wanted to re-post for those of you interested in visiting the Imperial War Museum:

As you may know, the Museum is undergoing major refurbishment to create new First World War galleries that will show more of our collections than ever before and tell a much wider history of the conflict on the battle and home fronts.
I am pleased to be able to tell you that TE Lawrence will be in the new galleries, however, at the moment I am not sure what the final selection of objects will be.  As we move closer to reopening the Museum in July, this information will be confirmed and more widely available.  Please don’t hesitate to check out our website www.iwm.org.uk or email again nearer your visit in October for more details.
The motorcycle that was on display here wasn’t, regrettably,  ever in the museum collections.  It is in private ownership.  The owner very generously lent it to the museum for a number of years.  When the museum closed for rebuilding, the loan agreement came to a close and it was returned.  I am pleased to say it is still regularly displayed by the owner at events and in other exhibitions and displays about the life of TE Lawrence.
T.E. Lawrence on his Brough Superior motorcycle. 

Source: http://www.lookandlearn.com/blog/3863/lawrence-of-arabia-death-of-a-freedom-fighter/

T.E. Lawrence on his Brough Superior motorcycle.

Source: http://www.lookandlearn.com/blog/3863/lawrence-of-arabia-death-of-a-freedom-fighter/

A page from the promotional brochure for Lowell Thomas’ “With Allenby in Palestine,” a travelogue which propelled T.E. Lawrence to fame. Circa 1920. Click to enlarge!

A page from the promotional brochure for Lowell Thomas’ “With Allenby in Palestine,” a travelogue which propelled T.E. Lawrence to fame. Circa 1920. Click to enlarge!

I’ve had a few requests to share my favorite books about T.E. Lawrence. I tried to limit myself to just those books I find myself reaching for often. 
My favorite biography is John E. Mack’s A Prince of Our Disorder. I’m partial towards it because it was the first Lawrence biography I read, but it is also well-researched, beautifully written, and I enjoyed the psychological analysis Mack provides. The author was a psychiatrist and professor at Harvard. 
Victoria Ocampo’s 338171, T.E. (Lawrence of Arabia) is another interesting read, a short biography by an Argentinian writer. T.E. Lawrence’s brother Arnold felt that it gave the best-balanced portrait of T.E. 
Harold Orlans’ T.E. Lawrence: Biography of a Broken Hero discusses obscure aspects of Lawrence’s life in great detail — things that are usually left out or only touched upon in most biographies. 
I think my favorite books are those of his letters. I’m a little more partial towards David Garnett’s Letters of T.E. Lawrence, but Malcolm Brown’s T.E. Lawrence: The Selected Letters is another essential. There’s a lot of overlap, but Malcolm Brown’s book contains letters that were purposefully omitted from Garnett’s. 
T.E. Lawrence by His Friends was edited by Lawrence’s youngest brother Arnold Lawrence. It is a collection of stories about T.E. from his dearest friends and colleagues.
Finally, for beautiful photographs, I include Joseph Berton’s T.E. Lawrence and the Arab Revolt and Malcolm Brown’s Lawrence of Arabia: the Life, the Legend. 

I’ve had a few requests to share my favorite books about T.E. Lawrence. I tried to limit myself to just those books I find myself reaching for often. 

  • My favorite biography is John E. Mack’s A Prince of Our Disorder. I’m partial towards it because it was the first Lawrence biography I read, but it is also well-researched, beautifully written, and I enjoyed the psychological analysis Mack provides. The author was a psychiatrist and professor at Harvard. 
  • Victoria Ocampo’s 338171, T.E. (Lawrence of Arabia) is another interesting read, a short biography by an Argentinian writer. T.E. Lawrence’s brother Arnold felt that it gave the best-balanced portrait of T.E. 
  • Harold Orlans’ T.E. Lawrence: Biography of a Broken Hero discusses obscure aspects of Lawrence’s life in great detail — things that are usually left out or only touched upon in most biographies. 
  • I think my favorite books are those of his letters. I’m a little more partial towards David Garnett’s Letters of T.E. Lawrence, but Malcolm Brown’s T.E. Lawrence: The Selected Letters is another essential. There’s a lot of overlap, but Malcolm Brown’s book contains letters that were purposefully omitted from Garnett’s. 
  • T.E. Lawrence by His Friends was edited by Lawrence’s youngest brother Arnold Lawrence. It is a collection of stories about T.E. from his dearest friends and colleagues.
  • Finally, for beautiful photographs, I include Joseph Berton’s T.E. Lawrence and the Arab Revolt and Malcolm Brown’s Lawrence of Arabia: the Life, the Legend
T.E. Lawrence as a child.

T.E. Lawrence as a child.

First love between a person and a film can be as intoxicating as first love between two people. It can mean just as much crazy behavior, just as many sleepless nights. As a young adolescent, I became so desperately obsessed with a certain film that I saw it over and over, spent years studying the life of its hero, regarding him as a kind of role model and even dragged my family on a long, dusty pilgrimage to a place where he had lived. If one measure of a film’s greatness is its power to affect the lives of those who see it, then Lawrence of Arabia must be the best film I know.
Film critic Janet Maslin
A rare signed photograph of T.E. Lawrence. You can see his signature in the bottom right-hand corner. Circa October 1917.

A rare signed photograph of T.E. Lawrence. You can see his signature in the bottom right-hand corner. Circa October 1917.