The Life of T.E. Lawrence

Photographs of the medieval castles visited by T.E. Lawrence and a map of his route can be found here!

Happy Birthday T.E. Lawrence, born August 16, 1888 in Tremadog, Wales. This is definitely one of my favorite photographs of him.

Happy Birthday T.E. Lawrence, born August 16, 1888 in Tremadog, Wales. This is definitely one of my favorite photographs of him.

Advertisement for Lowell Thomas’s travelogue.

Advertisement for Lowell Thomas’s travelogue.

headworld:

Progression I did for my Grandfather.He wanted to see how drawing with a tablet worked so I told him to pick something for me to draw.
He chose T.E Lawrence (Lawrence of Arabia).

headworld:

Progression I did for my Grandfather.
He wanted to see how drawing with a tablet worked so I told him to pick something for me to draw.

He chose T.E Lawrence (Lawrence of Arabia).

This Flickr album has two great, detailed shots of T.E. Lawrence’s effigy.

Auctioned newsprint photograph with T.E. Lawrence’s signature (T.E. Shaw). The clipping shows T.E. on one of his Brough Superior motorcycles while wearing his RAF uniform.
Auctioned newsprint photograph with T.E. Lawrence’s signature (T.E. Shaw). The clipping shows T.E. on one of his Brough Superior motorcycles while wearing his RAF uniform.

1935 New York Times article covering T.E. Lawrence’s motorcycle crash.

Up for auction (not mine) here!

A new T.E. Lawrence book came in the mail today! It’s a short French comic, Portrait inconnu de John Hume Ross by Philippe Squarzoni. It’s about 38 pages and draws from situations and conversations in The Mint. In fact, the first few pages illustrate Lawrence’s experience in the recruiting office. It’s a really neat little book and one I’m glad to add to my collection!

ouphrontis:

T.E. Lawrence’s Fire tank/Swimming pool at Clouds Hill, christened ‘Shaw’s Puddle’.

T.E. originally planned to built a fire tank to protect his cottage from heath fires. There was only a spring running near the property so T.E. installed a Vulcan hydraulic ram which used no electricity but only the water to drive it. It pumped water 35 feet uphill to his cottage cistern and his neighbour”s cottage, and later to the fire tank. The ram and water heater at Clouds Hill were believed to be the only ones of their kind in the world.

"I hear that heath fires are raging at Clouds Hill, and am sad and afraid for the little place. I’ve grown to love it, I fear. What fools we become!"- Letter to E.M. Forster June 26, 1934.

The water tank was 40 by 7 by 5 feet and held 7,000 gallons. T.E. and his friends frequently went swimming in the pool, even though it was bitterly cold.  In the first photograph you can see the carved teak doors from Jeddah which T.E. acquired in 1921. The doors are now in the Ashmolean Museum. They enclosed a study area that T.E. had planned to use as a workroom or guest cottage.  T.E. also planned to built a room over the pool for a hand-press which would work well in the humid environment.

In January of 1935 disaster struck the tank. The weight of the water had pushed the north wall, causing it to crack.

The big tank has cracked at it’s north end, and will have to be undercut and butressed. I shall get this in hand as soon as the weather permits, so as to have my water ready against the summer fire menace. So perhaps we can fill up by April 22. Or has your long convalescence put you out of love for the agonies of chill water?”” - Letter to his friend Jock Chambers

After T.E.’s death the pool was covered with branches to prevent people from falling in. It eventually disappeared under a thicket of rhododendron for almost half a century until it was excavated in 1991. The entire framework had collapsed and the pool was filled with glass and blue-painted wood. The ruins of the pool are preserved and can be seen in the grounds of the caretaker’s cottage at Clouds Hill.

Information and images taken from The Journal of the T.E. Lawrence Society - Vol.XV No.2

1920 newspaper promoting Lowell Thomas’s famous travelogue (“With Allenby in Palestine and Lawrence Arabia”) which propelled T.E. Lawrence to relative stardom. The travelogue is available online via the Imperial War Museum here.

1920 newspaper promoting Lowell Thomas’s famous travelogue (“With Allenby in Palestine and Lawrence Arabia”) which propelled T.E. Lawrence to relative stardom. The travelogue is available online via the Imperial War Museum here.