The Life of T.E. Lawrence
Biography of T.E. Lawrence in Yiddish.

Biography of T.E. Lawrence in Yiddish.

How did Lawrence's parents manage to keep the secret of their real identities from their sons for so long? Did Chapman's legitimate daughters have anything to say on the matter?
Anonymous

Thomas Chapman relinquished all of his rights to land and title in Ireland and started anew with Sarah.They kept their secret by moving frequently and distancing themselves from friends and family. Eventually they had to settle in Oxford for the sake of their son’s educations, but even so, they did not keep close family friends. I have never read anything about how Thomas Chapman’s daughters viewed the matter. I’m almost positive that T.E. had no contact with them. 

The fireplace T.E. Lawrence’s room at Jesus College. He only lived on campus from April to June, 1908 and spent the rest of his college days living at home in his private bungalow built in the garden of the family home. The photographer noted that the rest of the room could not be photographed because students were still living there! Lucky students!

The fireplace T.E. Lawrence’s room at Jesus College. He only lived on campus from April to June, 1908 and spent the rest of his college days living at home in his private bungalow built in the garden of the family home. The photographer noted that the rest of the room could not be photographed because students were still living there! Lucky students!

He had Shelley’s trick of noiselessly vanishing and reappearing. We would be sitting, reading on my only sofa: I would look up and Lawrence was not only not in the room, he was not in the house, he was not in Jerusalem. He was in the train on his way to Egypt.
Ronald Storrs on T.E. Lawrence

In the early 1920s, Lawrence of Arabia took time off in Kerala at Trichur. The author digs up some interesting details of his visit.

Interesting article from January 2014, although it is not accurate and includes “a photograph of T.E. Lawrence, his mother and K. Govinda Menon (centre) in England” and it’s definitely not T.E. in the photograph.

Some grain of truth from this story was found and discussed here (it was his brother, not T.E. who befriended Govinda Menon): http://issuu.com/brighton-and-hove-independent/docs/138-april-25-2014/6

THE ‘GHOST PORTRAIT’, by one of Lawrence’s primary artists and portraitists, who made the illustrations for Seven Pillars of Wisdom. This image, the collotype ordered in 100 copies by Lionel Cust, was based on Kennington’s first pastel portrait of c. 1920 for which Lawrence sat. Kennington was dissatisfied with it and put it aside. One copy of this collotype now hangs in Lawrence’s cottage, Cloud’s Hill. Ronald Storrs described Kennington’s actions: ‘[He] put the drawing-board on the floor, and two or three sheets of paper over the surface of the drawings, and walked on it for a minute. This, he found, greatly improved it, and gave him two portraits, the second faint and in reverse. Number 2 was unexpected, and revealed something not in the original. He put it away, and forgot it for fourteen years…After Lawrence’s death, Kennington was impressed both by its spiritual vitality and by the chance stigmata like wounds on the forehead.’Lawrence was very concerned about visual images of himself: there are something of the order of eighty painted or drawn portraits of him. He and Kennington had a particular rapport, they travelled together and became good friends.

THE ‘GHOST PORTRAIT’, by one of Lawrence’s primary artists and portraitists, who made the illustrations for Seven Pillars of Wisdom. This image, the collotype ordered in 100 copies by Lionel Cust, was based on Kennington’s first pastel portrait of c. 1920 for which Lawrence sat. Kennington was dissatisfied with it and put it aside. One copy of this collotype now hangs in Lawrence’s cottage, Cloud’s Hill. Ronald Storrs described Kennington’s actions: ‘[He] put the drawing-board on the floor, and two or three sheets of paper over the surface of the drawings, and walked on it for a minute. This, he found, greatly improved it, and gave him two portraits, the second faint and in reverse. Number 2 was unexpected, and revealed something not in the original. He put it away, and forgot it for fourteen years…After Lawrence’s death, Kennington was impressed both by its spiritual vitality and by the chance stigmata like wounds on the forehead.’

Lawrence was very concerned about visual images of himself: there are something of the order of eighty painted or drawn portraits of him. He and Kennington had a particular rapport, they travelled together and became good friends.

During the [Cairo] Conference we did our share of entertaining in our Cairo flat and I was used to my husband bringing people in with him at odd hours of day. So there seemed nothing out of the ordinary when one hot March afternoon he came in as usual at tea-time accompanied by a small and, I thought, not particularly distinguished-looking man in a blue suit, carrying a white topee.
My sister-in-law, Patty Edelston, and I were sitting together talking, and when Sydney introduced our visitor in typical English fashion we neither of us caught his name. I remember he was quiet and withdrawn and had a shock of untidy-looking fair hair, but beyond that he made no impression on me at all.
After tea Syndey drove him home, and when he came back he said: ‘Did you realize who that was?’
'No.'
'It was Lawrence of Arabia!'
'Good gracious!'
'And what's more, he's asked us to go to tea with him to-morrow.'
That was our first meeting.
-Clare Sydney Smith in The Golden Reign

During the [Cairo] Conference we did our share of entertaining in our Cairo flat and I was used to my husband bringing people in with him at odd hours of day. So there seemed nothing out of the ordinary when one hot March afternoon he came in as usual at tea-time accompanied by a small and, I thought, not particularly distinguished-looking man in a blue suit, carrying a white topee.

My sister-in-law, Patty Edelston, and I were sitting together talking, and when Sydney introduced our visitor in typical English fashion we neither of us caught his name. I remember he was quiet and withdrawn and had a shock of untidy-looking fair hair, but beyond that he made no impression on me at all.

After tea Syndey drove him home, and when he came back he said: ‘Did you realize who that was?’

'No.'

'It was Lawrence of Arabia!'

'Good gracious!'

'And what's more, he's asked us to go to tea with him to-morrow.'

That was our first meeting.

-Clare Sydney Smith in The Golden Reign

ouphrontis:

alamaris:


This was the text of the talk that Dennis Silk gave at the Imperial War Museum in 2007. The chance to put the names of two of my literary heroes together with his name on a title page was an opportunity that no self-respecting private press printer could allow to pass. The portrait illustration, engraved on boxwood by Jim Westergard, I suggested, might be the first published image of Sassoon and Lawrence together for even though Lawrence attended Sassoon’s wedding no photograph of them both appears to exist. Bound by Chris Hicks, there were 120 copies.
[x]

I love this, because a) what an exceedingly charming engraving, and b) I had no idea that T.E. attended Sassoon’s wedding.  If only there were photographs!
It appears that no digital copy of the IWM talk exists, but a summary implies that Silk was quite thoroughly admiring of both men (unsurprising, since he was a close friend of Sassoon’s).  It was, apparently, booked together with a talk by Jeremy Wilson on T.E.’s nautical associations.

I wish I lived in England to be able to attend some of these events!
Here is the letter SS wrote to TE, inviting him to the wedding.
"Dear T.E.
Can you be there next Monday - at Christchurch Priory - 12.30? The ceramony should interest you, & your presence would be much valued by the 2 protagonists. There won’t be more than 20 people there, at the most. It will give me an opportunity also of introducing you to Geoffry Keynes, - a man you out to know.
Yours ever. SS
P.S. No Top Hat”

ouphrontis:

alamaris:

This was the text of the talk that Dennis Silk gave at the Imperial War Museum in 2007. The chance to put the names of two of my literary heroes together with his name on a title page was an opportunity that no self-respecting private press printer could allow to pass. The portrait illustration, engraved on boxwood by Jim Westergard, I suggested, might be the first published image of Sassoon and Lawrence together for even though Lawrence attended Sassoon’s wedding no photograph of them both appears to exist. Bound by Chris Hicks, there were 120 copies.

[x]

I love this, because a) what an exceedingly charming engraving, and b) I had no idea that T.E. attended Sassoon’s wedding.  If only there were photographs!

It appears that no digital copy of the IWM talk exists, but a summary implies that Silk was quite thoroughly admiring of both men (unsurprising, since he was a close friend of Sassoon’s).  It was, apparently, booked together with a talk by Jeremy Wilson on T.E.’s nautical associations.

I wish I lived in England to be able to attend some of these events!

Here is the letter SS wrote to TE, inviting him to the wedding.

"Dear T.E.

Can you be there next Monday - at Christchurch Priory - 12.30? The ceramony should interest you, & your presence would be much valued by the 2 protagonists. There won’t be more than 20 people there, at the most. It will give me an opportunity also of introducing you to Geoffry Keynes, - a man you out to know.

Yours ever. SS

P.S. No Top Hat”

He was an inexpressibly complicated person. In a sense he was tragically sincere. But, also, he always had one eye on the limelight… in the end, he was dreadfully lonely. The strangest contact of my life.
Charlotte Shaw on her friendship with T.E. Lawrence
ouphrontis:

"After having dabbled in revolt and politics it is rather nice to have been mechanically useful." - T.E. Lawrence in the R.A.F helping to design and test speedboats.
Photos is from Malcolm Brown’s book Lawrence of Arabia - The Life, the Legend

I think someone had asked me about this image! 

ouphrontis:

"After having dabbled in revolt and politics it is rather nice to have been mechanically useful." - T.E. Lawrence in the R.A.F helping to design and test speedboats.

Photos is from Malcolm Brown’s book Lawrence of Arabia - The Life, the Legend

I think someone had asked me about this image!