The Life of T.E. Lawrence
It's a pleasure following your blog! Everything is absolutely wonderful and inspirational for my days and obviously for many others. I wanted to ask where did you find the last one photos about Thomas Edward that you posted. It's incredibly marvellous! I just adore it! Thanks for your time. AmorMoveoSol

Thank you so much! I love reading comments like this as maintaining this blog is such a happy distraction for me. I love to see how much the blog following has grown over the past two years.

To answer your question, the photo (T.E. Lawrence at the Smith’s cottage) was scanned from a book called T.E. Lawrence and the Arab Revolt by Joseph Berton. The book is definitely one of my favorites, and only recently published in 2011.

babyseapancake:

for the night crowd c:*

Awesome Seven Pillars of Wisdom tattoo!

T.E. Lawrence by William Roberts, 1922. Roberts completed many paintings and drawings for Seven Pillars of Wisdom. This portrait was painted during Lawrence’s first stay in the RAF (Royal Air Force).

T.E. Lawrence by William Roberts, 1922. Roberts completed many paintings and drawings for Seven Pillars of Wisdom. This portrait was painted during Lawrence’s first stay in the RAF (Royal Air Force).

Gold dagger, belt and scabbard. Lawrence wore the dagger, discreetly acquired in Mecca in 1917, during the war; it also appears in the famous Augustus John portrait. He had it made small because a full-size one would have been too cumbersome. After the war he sold it to pay for repairs to his Dorset cottage, “Clouds Hill”; in 1938 it was given to All Souls College.
Head cloth and agal (head rope). Lawrence had purchased the head-dress in Aleppoin 1912 and given it to his mother the following year. He recovered it to wear during the war because good quality examples were by then hard to obtain.

Source: http://www.awm.gov.au/blog/2007/11/15/loans-from-all-souls-college-oxford/

Gold dagger, belt and scabbard. Lawrence wore the dagger, discreetly acquired in Mecca in 1917, during the war; it also appears in the famous Augustus John portrait. He had it made small because a full-size one would have been too cumbersome. After the war he sold it to pay for repairs to his Dorset cottage, “Clouds Hill”; in 1938 it was given to All Souls College.

Head cloth and agal (head rope). Lawrence had purchased the head-dress in Aleppoin 1912 and given it to his mother the following year. He recovered it to wear during the war because good quality examples were by then hard to obtain.

Source: http://www.awm.gov.au/blog/2007/11/15/loans-from-all-souls-college-oxford/

pablolf:

Lawrence of Arabia - Conversation with Steven Spielberg.VOB (por arabialawrencearabia)

Sketch of T.E. Lawrence by artist David A. Johnson. Check out his tumblr where he posts one sketch and quote a day! Really great stuff. 
Source: http://davidajohnsonart.tumblr.com/

Sketch of T.E. Lawrence by artist David A. Johnson. Check out his tumblr where he posts one sketch and quote a day! Really great stuff.


Source: http://davidajohnsonart.tumblr.com/

Folio Society edition of T.E. Lawrence’s Seven Pillars of Wisdom.
Get yours here!

Folio Society edition of T.E. Lawrence’s Seven Pillars of Wisdom.

Get yours here!

T.E. Lawrence at the Clare Sydney Smith’s cottage at Thurlestone, Devon, 1931.

T.E. Lawrence at the Clare Sydney Smith’s cottage at Thurlestone, Devon, 1931.

Do you have any information about what T.E. Lawrence's contemporaries (if any) thought about the 1962 film and its portrayal of him?
Anonymous

I found a very succinct response to this question in Joseph Berton’s T.E. Lawrence and the Arab Revolt:

Many friends of Lawrence were not pleased with the film’s portrayal of him. His brother, A.W. Lawrence, had already taken back permission to use the title of Seven Pillars of Wisdom for the film. After its release he stated in an interview that while he admired the film’s spectacle, directing and music, he was bothered by his brother’s portrayal, particularly of his being sadistic. “I don’t want to give the impression that I consider the Lawrence of the film to be entirely untrue. So far especially as determination, courage, and endurance are concerned, he is comparable… with the man [Peter O’Toole] purports to represent… I need only say that I should not have recognized my brother.” Lowell Thomas sent A.W. letters of support and wrote his own criticism to the movie, namely its lack of historical accuracy, and he praised only the camels. Liddell Hart wrote letters protesting the sadistic depiction of Lawrence at Tafas. This was not the Lawrence he knew.

This is really a beautifully done collection, and a great pleasure to browse thru. Congratulations on your fine work. I have been obsessed with Lawrence since i was 9 years old, when I saw the movie in its first American run. My son is a journalist in the Middle East and last fall I met him in Jordan. We drove from Amman to Akaba, stopping for a three-day camel trek in Wadi Rum. If you think your readers would be interested, I'd be happy to send you information on contacting good Beduin guides.

Thank you so much for your kind words! What an amazing opportunity for you to have toured Jordan! I would love to make a similar trip, someday. I’m sure information about good Bedouin guides would be welcomed by readers.