The Life of T.E. Lawrence

ouphrontis:

Photos for the upcoming paperback edition of Seven Pillars of Wisdom - The Oxford Text

Copies can be obtained at Castle Hill Press, where they will also be releasing other paperback editions in the months to come:

-Minor Writings (A substantial collection of Lawrence’s published articles and introductions, brought together conveniently in a single volume)
-Translations from Arabic, French and Greek (Including The Odyssey and The Forest Giant)
-'The Mint' and later writings about service life

1962 playbill for the play “Ross” based on the life of T.E. Lawrence, written by Terence Rattigan and starring John Mills.
Not my auction here.
You can find a full script from the play here.

1962 playbill for the play “Ross” based on the life of T.E. Lawrence, written by Terence Rattigan and starring John Mills.

Not my auction here.

You can find a full script from the play here.

Illustration of T.E. Lawrence by Adam Zyglis.

Illustration of T.E. Lawrence by Adam Zyglis.

A 1928 magazine article about T.E. Lawrence.

A 1928 magazine article about T.E. Lawrence.

One of T.E. Lawrence’s letters to Colonel Newcombe in which he apologizes for being a bad letter writer. “I owe you five letters! At first it wasn’t worth while for you were reported to me in one week as at Aleppo, Azrak Bagdad & Cairo: and then it became a habit…”

One of T.E. Lawrence’s letters to Colonel Newcombe in which he apologizes for being a bad letter writer. “I owe you five letters! At first it wasn’t worth while for you were reported to me in one week as at Aleppo, Azrak Bagdad & Cairo: and then it became a habit…”

T.E. Lawrence’s gramophone needle fiber cutter. Auctioned off for $988.

T.E. Lawrence’s gramophone needle fiber cutter. Auctioned off for $988.

Letter from T.E. Lawrence to friend and fellow author H.M. Tomlinson, author of All Our Yesterdays.

… . An introduction by me would only do harm. Twice I have ‘introduced’ books and lived to regret it. It holds the smoky glass of oneself between the writer & his readers. Really it is ignoble and should be resisted. All the same it is hard to resist … To harden my heart against the temptation to repeat this sin, I set a bough above my head a determination (blessed fifty-five times and thrice regretted) not to write & sign—ever—anything again. You are a writer, born and inevitable. I am not. Writers are not like the rest of people: they feel, & put on paper, and have a certainty of goodness about them. Alas: they are to be envied. I just drool on & on, wanting to do something intangible, and good only at tangible things, like floor-polishing, or painting, or filing bits of metal. 

I re-read ‘All Our Yesterdays’ about a month ago, with the knowledge of your letter behind me, and saw at once that what made me miss parts of it lay in our situations. You are indignant because the generation (of which I was a detail) died in the war: and we are not indignant, just because we died. The sacrifice hurts the by-standers more than the victims … It is by itself as a war-book, which is to be distinguished: in that it doesn’t really love the details and dress-furniture of fighting. All the others mix regret into their pictures. You hate it all. They call the others anti-war books: and the young airmen in camp gloat over them and say ‘My god, to think that we missed all that.’ Your book is so hot with anger all through that it prevents people liking it. I think that is honest & good of you: yet it will have reduced its sale. / I hope you will make us, some day, a quite clean happy picture book: something quite English and vulgar, with a laughing zest of life in it: about people who do not over-think and over-feel….

The book room and bathroom (storage/bathing) at Clouds Hill, 1935.

T.E. Lawrence’s rifle, a British short magazine Lee Enfield SMLE 3.
The rifle was presented to Lawrence by Prince Feisal. Lawrence used it for the rest of the war and later presented it to King George V.
His initials are carved on the side along with the date 4.12.16.

T.E. Lawrence’s rifle, a British short magazine Lee Enfield SMLE 3.

The rifle was presented to Lawrence by Prince Feisal. Lawrence used it for the rest of the war and later presented it to King George V.

His initials are carved on the side along with the date 4.12.16.

ouphrontis:

Carchemish, where T.E. Lawrence worked from 1911-1913.

"At Carchemish he always wore a blazer of French grey trimmed with pink, white shorts held up by a gaudy Arab belt with swinging tassels (it was a belt only worn by bachelors and Lawrence had his tassels made bigger than anyone else’s), grey stockings, red Arab Slippers and no hat; his hair was always very long and in wild disorder - he used to say that it was too long when it got into his mouth at mealtimes. In the evenings he would put on over his white shirt and shorts a white and gold embroidered Arab waistcoat and a magnificent cloak of gold and silver thread.

He liked practical jokes, not least those which might annoy but his pleasure in them was so ingenuous that it was hard to take offence. On a wet and stormy night, when I had retired early with a bout of fever, Lawrence cut a wind-vane from a biscuit-tin and fixed it with a rusty nail to my tent pole; its grinding screech kept me awake and on the search for the wretched thing all through the night. When Hogarth came once to visit us Lawrence made most elaborate preparation; he produced from somewhere or other, quantities of cheap pink satin ribbon and some bits of lace; Hogarth’s Spartan mud-walled room was given lace curtains with a big pink bow, there was a coquettish pink bow on the looking-glass, and on the dressing table a pincushion and tray of hair-pins, ‘to make him feel at home’.

It was he who invented the system whereby a discovery was saluted by revolver-shots carefully proportioned to its importance. Or Lawrence and Hamoudi would suddenly turn the whole work into a game, and pick-men pitted against the basket-men or the entire gang against the wagon-boys, until with two hundred men running and yelling half a day’s output would be accomplished in an hour; and Lawrence would lead the yells.”

-Leonard Woolley