A really lovely T.E. Lawrence wallpaper by deviantART user TheRavenArt. The quote comes from a poem by Ernest Dowson (“Impenitentia Ultima”) but was also mentioned in Seven Pillars of Wisdom as a passage that was running through his head when he fell from his camel.
Here’s the poem:
BEFORE my light goes out forever if God should give me a choice of graces, I would not reck of length of days, nor crave for things to be; But cry: “One day of the great lost days, one face of all the faces,Grant me to see and touch once more and nothing more to see.
"For, Lord, I was free of all Thy flowers, but I chose the world’s sad roses,And that is why my feet are torn and mine eyes are blind with sweat,But at Thy terrible judgement-seat, when this my tired life closes,I am ready to reap whereof I sowed, and pay my righteous debt."But once the sand is run and the silver thread is broken,Give me a grace and cast aside the veil of dolorous years,Grant me one hour of all mine hours, and let me see for a tokenHer pure and pitiful eyes shine out, and bathe her feet with tears.”Her pitiful hands should calm, and her hair stream down and blind me,Out of the sight of night, and out of the reach of fear,And her eyes should be my light whilst the sun went out behind me,And the viols in her voice be the last sound in mine ear.Before the ruining waters fall and my life be carried under,And Thine anger cleave me through as a child cuts down a flower,I will praise Thee, Lord, in Hell while my limbs are racked asunder,For the last sad sight of her face and the little grace of an hour.

A really lovely T.E. Lawrence wallpaper by deviantART user TheRavenArt. The quote comes from a poem by Ernest Dowson (“Impenitentia Ultima”) but was also mentioned in Seven Pillars of Wisdom as a passage that was running through his head when he fell from his camel.

Here’s the poem:

BEFORE my light goes out forever if God should give me a choice of graces, I would not reck of length of days, nor crave for things to be; But cry: “One day of the great lost days, one face of all the faces,Grant me to see and touch once more and nothing more to see.

"For, Lord, I was free of all Thy flowers, but I chose the world’s sad roses,
And that is why my feet are torn and mine eyes are blind with sweat,
But at Thy terrible judgement-seat, when this my tired life closes,
I am ready to reap whereof I sowed, and pay my righteous debt.

"But once the sand is run and the silver thread is broken,
Give me a grace and cast aside the veil of dolorous years,
Grant me one hour of all mine hours, and let me see for a token
Her pure and pitiful eyes shine out, and bathe her feet with tears.”

Her pitiful hands should calm, and her hair stream down and blind me,
Out of the sight of night, and out of the reach of fear,
And her eyes should be my light whilst the sun went out behind me,
And the viols in her voice be the last sound in mine ear.

Before the ruining waters fall and my life be carried under,
And Thine anger cleave me through as a child cuts down a flower,
I will praise Thee, Lord, in Hell while my limbs are racked asunder,
For the last sad sight of her face and the little grace of an hour.

The remnants of an RAF 200 Class Seaplane Tender, a boat that T.E. Lawrence helped develop and test in the early 1930’s. He also wrote a detailed operational manual for this model of boat which was republished in Boats of the R.A.F. printed in limited edition by Castle Hill Press. 
See more photos of the boat at the source: http://www.merseyshipping.co.uk/photofeatures/historicships/200seaplanetender/200seaplanetender.htm

The remnants of an RAF 200 Class Seaplane Tender, a boat that T.E. Lawrence helped develop and test in the early 1930’s. He also wrote a detailed operational manual for this model of boat which was republished in Boats of the R.A.F. printed in limited edition by Castle Hill Press.

See more photos of the boat at the source: http://www.merseyshipping.co.uk/photofeatures/historicships/200seaplanetender/200seaplanetender.htm

14 Barton Street in London, where T.E. Lawrence lived and worked on Seven Pillars of Wisdom. The  garret room belonged to his architect friend Herbert Baker.

"I’m perfectly well, & very comfortable in Barton Street which is quite beautiful. The quiet of so little a place in the middle of a great mess has to be experienced a thousand times before it is properly felt. I will be very sorry to leave, when I have to leave, but it’s altogether too pleasant to be allowed to go on too long."

- T.E. Lawrence to his mother, February 1922

A collection of photographs relating to T.E.Lawrence held by the British Library. Check out this amazing digitized gallery here: http://www.bl.uk/manuscripts/Viewer.aspx?ref=add_ms_50584_b_fs001r

A collection of photographs relating to T.E.Lawrence held by the British Library. Check out this amazing digitized gallery here: http://www.bl.uk/manuscripts/Viewer.aspx?ref=add_ms_50584_b_fs001r

T.E. Lawrence makes an appearance in the Autumn 2014 Quarterly Journal of Military History.

T.E. Lawrence makes an appearance in the Autumn 2014 Quarterly Journal of Military History.

Top: T.E. Lawrence and Lowell Thomas in London, 1920.

Bottom: Dust jacket for Lowell Thomas’s book about T.E. Lawrence.

The Lowell Thomas review is an excellent idea, & should be great fun. I resent him: but am disarmed by his good intentions. He is as vulgar as they make them: believes he is doing me a great turn by bringing my virtue into the public air:

He came out to Allenby as an American official correspondent, saw a scoop in our side-show, & came to Akaba (1918) for ten days. I saw him there, for the second time, but went up country to do some other work. He bored the others, so they packed him off by Ford car to Petra, & thence back to Egypt by sea. His spare credulity they packed with stories about me. He was shown copies of my official reports, & made long extracts or summaries of them. Of course he was never in the Arab firing line, nor did he ever see an operation or ride with me. I met him occasionally afterwards in London in 1920.

So much for his basis. The rest of his book is either invention or gossip. Some of the invention is deliberate, though much that he put into his American magazine articles (red-hot lying it was)has been left out of the American edition of his book. I’ve not seen the English edition. I thought the American version so disjointed & broken-backed as to be nearly unintelligible, as a history of me in Arabia or of the Arab Campaign above my head! However perhaps I am biased.

His details are commonly wrong. My family isn’t Irish from Galway (we were Elizabethan plantation from Leicestershire in Meath without a drop of Irish blood in us, ever) … and they hadn’t any ancestors called Lawrence (which is a very recent assumption, no better based than Shaw or Ross or any other of my names.) His school & college yarns are rubbish: ditto his story that I was medically unfit, or a child when the war began. I was employed in the Geographical Section of the General Staff in the War Office till December 1914.

I was never disguised as an Arab (though I once got off as a Circassian & nearly got on as a veiled woman!)

My height is 5’5 1/2”! Weight ten stone. Complexion scarlet. I have not been pursued by Italian Countesses.

-T.E. Lawrence debunking Lowell Thomas’s inaccuracies in a letter to friend and author E.M. Forster, June 1925

T. E. LAWRENCE PAPERS. Vol. III (ff. ii + 59). Army Field Service Correspondence Book, containing notes and memoranda by Lawrence relating to events, etc., in the Arabian campaign; 30 Oct. 1916-16 Apr. 1917. The entries are written in pencil, partly in diary form, but do not follow a strict chronological sequence. A few loose papers inserted at the end (ff. 56-59) include a description by Lawrence, also in pencil, of events 9 May-9 July 1917, dated Cairo, 10 July 1917 (ff. 56-57).
Courtesy of the Britsh Library. Read the manuscript here (if you can decipher T.E.’s handwriting): http://www.bl.uk/manuscripts/Viewer.aspx?ref=add_ms_45914_fs001r

T. E. LAWRENCE PAPERS. Vol. III (ff. ii + 59). Army Field Service Correspondence Book, containing notes and memoranda by Lawrence relating to events, etc., in the Arabian campaign; 30 Oct. 1916-16 Apr. 1917. The entries are written in pencil, partly in diary form, but do not follow a strict chronological sequence. A few loose papers inserted at the end (ff. 56-59) include a description by Lawrence, also in pencil, of events 9 May-9 July 1917, dated Cairo, 10 July 1917 (ff. 56-57).

Courtesy of the Britsh Library. Read the manuscript here (if you can decipher T.E.’s handwriting): http://www.bl.uk/manuscripts/Viewer.aspx?ref=add_ms_45914_fs001r

Where can I find more pictures of T.E.'s siblings?

Asked by Anonymous

Most T.E. Lawrence biographies have a few photos of his mother and siblings.You can also find more under the tag “youth” on this blog. Overall there aren’t many photos of them available, especially because two died in the war.

Weird question, but: what was Lawrence's weight on average? Deadliest Warrior wikia lists it as 130 lbs, but I kinda doubt the legitimacy of the source and I didn't find anything else XD

Asked by crazypreacher

Eric Kennington once said that he looked to weight around 11 stone (154 lbs) in 1920. Although I do recall reading about him being severely underweight either after his walking tour of Syria or after the war - something like 120 lbs. While he was short, he was also very strong which is why I think he likely did weigh 130-150lbs depending on his age and whether it was pre or post-war.

Members of T.E. Lawrence’s hired bodyguard.

Members of T.E. Lawrence’s hired bodyguard.

T.E. Lawrence with Antonin Jaussen, a cleric and archaeologist on board the HMS Lama in March 1917.

T.E. Lawrence with Antonin Jaussen, a cleric and archaeologist on board the HMS Lama in March 1917.

Photos, quotes, and other tidbits based on the life and legend of T.E. Lawrence, more commonly known as Lawrence of Arabia. Please use the links at the top of the page (specifically the "Tags" link) in order to find more information about specific aspects of T.E. Lawrence's life.


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